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The Intense Moment When A Bear Takes On A Pack of Wolves For Dinner

 

This is the bloody moment a bear takes on a whole pack of wolves in an incredible brawl over a dead deer.

The spectacular action shots taken by British holidaymaker Tom Littlejohns, show the pack of wolves enjoying their prey until they are interrupted by a six-and-a-half-foot long bear.

To protect their dinner, the brave wolves attempted to warn off the bear but one by one were swatted away by the grizzly’s giant paws.

One close-up picture shows one wolf baring its teeth on the blood-stained snow as the bear continues to fight.

While the other photos show the lone bear enjoying a deer supper after scaring off its rivals.

The amazing photographs snapped by Mr Littlejohns, 75, a logistics consultant from Guildford while on a trip to the Rocky Mountains in Montana.

He said: ‘In these particular images, I saw the change from relatively docile and almost large cuddly wolves become unbelievably ferocious both with each other and prepared to take on a fully grown Grizzly.’

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You win this round: While the bear appears satisfied with its afternoon work, one of the wolves can be seen watching on, cowering, ruing its luck at encountering a bigger foe.

Gray wolves were virtually wiped out in the lower 48 states by the 1940s, but thanks to a highly successful reintroduction program in central Idaho and Yellowstone National Park, the population is once again back.

By the end of 2012, the estimated population in the Northern Rockies region was 1,674 wolves.

By comparison, there are only about 1,500 grizzlies left in the lowest 48 states, with about 800 living in Montana alone and another 600 or so in Wyoming, in the Yellowstone-Teton area.

The scene captured by Mr Littlejohns is actually somewhat of a common occurrence, with grizzlies locating a carcass with its keen sense of smell once an animal has been killed by a wolf.

As the wolves and the grizzly compete for the kill, one wolf may try to distract the bear while the others feed. But such is the size of the bear, that if wolves become aggressive, it can defend itself by sitting, eliminating being attacked at its hind legs. Fights rarely end in death or serious injury to either animal.

Source: Daily Mail

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E. Goldstein

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