What Is Next For Anti-Terrorist Travel Ban?


As the Presidents Travel ban finally takes effect more than 3 months after it was first placed in effect, Liberal media is already recalling images of families being separated, students being stranded overseas unable to return to classes or jobs and poor refugees stuck in airports with no one to take care of them. Well guess what? I don’t care.

travel ban

My president decided, quite justifiably, that people from these areas needed to undergo a more complete screening process, something that he has every legal right to do as head of the executive branch of our government. Then the liberal crybabies that are trying desperately to hamper any effort at making our country grate again and making sure that our citizens are safe in their homes and streets, started filing frivolous lawsuits in an attempt to derail the order.

With the recent lifting of the injunction that appears to have been bought and paid for by former president Obama and his minions, the left is sure to start filing more lawsuits asking for injunctions that will halt the program and allow potential terrorists into our country. The travel ban restricts visitors from six Muslim majority nations and on Monday, the Supreme Court ruled it could be largely reinstated pending a hearing on the merits in the fall. But due to missteps when the program was quickly rolled out earlier this year, it resulted in some confusion in airports.

The President has said every effort will be made not to repeat that confusion. Meanwhile, State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert told Bloomberg News.“We will keep those traveling to the United States and partners in the travel industry informed as we implement the order in a professional, organized and timely way.”

Language in the Supreme Court’s order may contribute to confusion this time around. It created an exception for travelers with “bona fide” relationships to people in the U.S., thus opening the ban to possible endless legal challenges from liberals. In an effort to avoid this, the State Department said it is awaiting a determination from the Department of Justice on how to define a bona fide relationship, and also how to implement the policy once it’s defined.

People who do not have a verifiable relationship with individuals or companies, will probably be prevented from entering the country. Tourists from Sudan, Somalia, Yemen, Iran, Libya and Syria may be banned from entering. That group would amount to only about 100,000 tourists according to State Department data.

The main effect of the ruling will be on “refugees who lack any” connection to the U.S.. That means if they cannot demonstrate “a bona fide relationship” with individuals or entities in the United States, they will likely be refused entry. In addition, “Tourists may also be barred from admission if they don’t have any established links to the country,” said Kolken.