Amazon’s Alexa Goes NUTS, Tells People To KILL THEIR PARENTS!


We have come a long way in terms of technology and so many of those things can be used for good.

For example, when you look at what we can do now in term of storing data period it’s absolutely amazing.

I remember when I was in the military and MP3 players were around when I joined but they were a little cost prohibitive given the amount of data that you could hold on them.

These days you can go into an electronics store and for quite literally a couple of hundred dollars buy a small laptop that you could fit in a bunk locker that’s not much bigger than a phone book and no thicker than a deck of cards. Added to that those removable flash drives that you can store all kinds of media on and you’ve got a deployment that is much more comfortable.

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On the other hand, we have technology that is going too far. Look at what Walmart wants to do with the sound catching things that they are trying to get approval for. What exactly does Walmart need to know my conversation in aisle six with my wife for? There needs to be some kind of limits to what we allow technology to do.

Via Western Journal:

One of Amazon’s newest projects is researching ways to make Alexa a more human-like communicator for customers, but sometimes the virtual assistant’s language comes as creepy and offensive.

New research is making Alexa better mimic human response, Reuters reported Friday, citing people familiar with the matter. The research sometimes results in awkward moments for people who frequently interact with the device.

One user, for instance, was surprised after Alexa said: “Kill your foster parents.”

It’s not an isolated incident, according to Reuters. There are also instances of Alexa chatting with users about graphic sex acts and dogs defecating.

The report also showed sources noting that a hack of Amazon traced back to China likely exposed some customers’ data.

The hack comes as the company works night-and-day on operations making artificial intelligence better at handling complex human interactions.